Category Archives: D-I-Y media

Reclaiming the Commons: MODE Istanbul in The Guardian

Doc Next Network partners MODE Istanbul recently had their work with Sokak Bizim, a Turkish NGO dedicated to making cities more liveable, displayed on The Guardian Witness. Here we explore some of their project’s themes through a curated playlist from our Media Collection.

In light of Istanbul’s insistence to continue plans to redevelop Gezi Park, The Guardian Witness recently put out a call for content about civic movements seeking to defend public space. Our partners at MODE Istanbul responded to that call, and you can currently see their work with Sokak Bizim (“Streets Belong to Us”) displayed on their page.

The goal of Sokak Bizim is to engage in placemaking activities that breathe life back into the public spaces that are so rapidly being devoured by the Turkish government’s ferocious pursuit of urbanisation. As streets are cleared of people to make way for capital, the city’s pulse quickens. The pace of human life struggles to catch up, but rarely does. The constant sense of urgency only adds to the anxiety, in a feedback loop of personal stress and social tension. Genuine moments of peace become fewer and further between:
Mobile Inner Peace (Mobil İç Huzur) is just one selection from a playlist of content from the Doc Next Network archive that was lovingly curated by María Yañez to explore some of the themes underlying Sokak Bizim and MODE Istanbul’s campaign to make their city more liveable. There are curated playlists for each of our local Reclaiming the Commons campaigns (in Poland, Spain and the UK, in addition to Turkey), which we will highlight here over the coming weeks. We invite you to explore these videos and make them yours by playing with them, chopping them up, remixing them or integrating them into your own DIY creations. Like our public spaces, they are there to be shared.

Radical Democracy Video Challenge: Award Ceremony + Screening

On May 18, the ten best videos of Radical Democracy: European Video Challenge 2014 will be screened at the Planete+ Doc Film Festival in Warsaw, Poland – in the heart of Europe. The Award Ceremony marks the highlight of the Radical Democracy Challenge, which was launched three months ago.

Finalist #6: THE TREES OF GEZI by Italo Rondinella amongst others. It's Gezi through the eyes of 10-year old Selma.

Finalist #6: THE TREES OF GEZI by Italo Rondinella amongst others. It’s Gezi through the eyes of 10-year old Selma.

On February 17, Doc Next Network called on media makers, social activists and critical thinkers to take a stand: to share their views on ‘Europe’, reflect on alternatives, and create new narratives for an open society. A total of 212 media makers from across Europe responded and submitted their work.  (more…)

Free Masterclass “The making of €urovisions”

The Making of €urovisions – A Free masterclass on Remix and Live Cinema by the international artists’ collective European Souvenirs
Are you an arts student? Are you interested in remix culture and techniques, Live Cinema performance, expanded documentary and audiovisual culture?

Find out what happens when four artists from different backgrounds and countries come together to research and use existing audiovisual archives to produce a live cinema experience. What is the collaborative and creative process they go through? What tools do they use?

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Want to know more about different techniques for multiscreening, sampling and more? Want to find out about composing and performing live music while tackling the difficult topic of how migrants are shown in the mainstream media in Europe?

€urovisions is a Live Cinema performance that encompasses all of that. The Spanish online newspaper El Diario, wrote this about the €urovisions premiere in Seville last month, “It isn’t cinema, a concert or a live broadcast. This sum of many parts is quite incomprehensible until you find yourself in front of it.”

4ab96479606d46953da229d7df5fd5bd.jpegWe see pictures of migrants from news footage, illustrating rhetoric about the political and economic causes and pre-assumed effects of migration – but what are these people’s names? Why are they here? What are their own personal stories?

The show is produced in collaboration with the Spanish collective Zemos98 and Chris Allen and Tim Cowie, artists of The Light Surgeons, the renowned UK-based live cinema group.

The Dutch premiere of €urovisions will take place at the Eye Film Institute in Amsterdam on 20 May. You can attend for free. And if you can’t make it in person, the show will also be streamed live on ECF’s website.

You are also invited to join the special European Souvenirs artists’ masterclass on the 22 May to find out more about the complexity of the processes of an international collaboration and live cinema performance. During this informal masterclass, the artists will be happy to share their experiences and enter into a dialogue with participants!

To get your free ticket for the premiere and to join the masterclass, please register your interest by sending an email with the title “masterclass” to this address: masterclass@culturalfoundation.eu. Please be aware there are only 25 places available for the masterclass – and these are available on a first come, first served basis.

Prior to the €urovisions performance, you can also join the launch of the bookRemixing Europe: migrants, media, representation and imagery. This will include a conversation about the role of media in democracy, with Naema Tahir, a human rights lawyer based in the Netherlands and the Spanish Deputy Director of El Diario and contributor to the book, Juan Luis Sánchez.

The €urovisions premiere, the presentation of Remixing Europe: migrants, media, representation and imagery and the masterclass are supported by Amsterdams Fonds voor de Kunst and Stichting Democratie en Media.

€urovisions is part of Remapping Europe – a Remix Project, an investigative artistic project by Doc Next Network with activities that stem from one underlying principle: re-mixing of media as a method to re-view, re-investigate and re-consider prevailing imagery of migrants in European societies. The Doc Next Network was set up in 2010 by ECF with the aim of generating access to wider public opinion. 

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MODE Istanbul exploring the ‘Gezi Spirit’

Humorous tag lines and strong imageries on banners, walls, and social media, rainbow colored stairs, the ‘standing men’ on the streets… Clever and provocative videos, documentaries, remixes… Activism became art, art became activism…

dervis_ardaCreative resistance, online and offline, was at the core of the recent Gezi Protests in Turkey and fueled the ‘Gezi Spirit’: People of different social/cultural backgrounds used different outlets to spread the news and to share their voices, while the mainstream media kept its silence. The Gezi (Media) Lab was launched by Doc Next partner MODE Istanbul at the onset of the protests to provide a space for young people to explore the Gezi Spirit and to produce new media works, individually and collectively. Each mini lab, held once a month, includes talks & discussions with guest speakers, hands-on workshops, visits to and screenings at park forums, and focuses on different themes such as “The Symbols of Gezi”, “Video Activism”, “Gender and Resistance”,  “The Sound of Gezi”, “The Right to the City and Migration”.

come as you areThe labbers seek to create links between the widely discussed subjects the Gezi events brought to the forefront like citizens rights, censorship, urban transformation, the reclaiming of public spaces, collective action, commons and migration, and express via their media works their views.

Read more…

Remix culture frames Remapping Europe

In Remapping Europe, we use re-mixing of media both as a tool as well as a cultural framework. The concept of ‘remix’ refers to a broad set of social and cultural practices consisting of the fragmentation, re-ordering, and re-contextualisation of both pre-existing and new content – whether text, sound or image.

url-3Perhaps as a result of the digital shift or perhaps simply as a sign of the times, creators today are working generally more inter-disciplinarily, less willing to define themselves by, or confine themselves to, a single discipline. Remapping Europe brings together film, video, live cinema, performance, media, remixed image and sound and reflects new audiences’ interests. The artists have different profiles complementing each other as media artists, performers, 3D animators, documentarians, musicians, DJs and VJs.

Remix culture frames Remapping Europe: de-constructing narrative(s), recreating new narrative(s) of representation, using D-I-Y forms of media production and appropriating mass media texts. It is a cultural operating system, in which existing audiovisual material and images are framed in a new context, juxtaposed and seen from a fresh perspective, revealing new visions on our past, present and future. Remix is also a tool that is accessible, reflects a multidimensional, rather than a linear interest, and encompasses everything from collaging to digital storytelling.

At its root, both Doc Next Network and Remapping Europe are intergenerational – looking at Europe as the intersection of generations rather than a division or gap between generations. The organisations on the ground have designed intergenerational activities for their communities and the project brought together the narration of the young creators with that of their parents and grandparents. It remixes and weaves the stories, contexts and perspectives of older generations through archival searching – confronting and interrogating them. A personal story becomes the centre of a more collective narrative. Because we are standing on the brink of the greatest generational shift that we have experienced in the western world, we must find intergenerational approaches and innovations – intergenerational knowledge sharing – rather than looking at projects, programmes or solutions that address ‘older’ people and others that address ‘youth’. The inclusiveness of our communities must also include generations.

url-4Many of these intersections raise questions and fuel debate, sometimes heated. Perhaps the most debated is the notion of the value of inter-experiential connections and knowledge – placing the voice of the expert alongside that of the ‘experienced’. The digital shift has played havoc with the comfortable hierarchies that we are accustomed to: between the writer and the reader; the teacher and the student; the amateur and the professional; the consumer and the producer; the institution and the individual. Accessibility of technology means that everyone can create and share their creation without any intermediaries – D-I-Y takes on a whole new meaning. However it is not just Do it Yourself – but it is also Do it With Others, or Do it Together. The subtitle of European Souvenirs, ‘Remixing media, crossing (shifting) borders’, also refers to these elements and intersections.

The increased opening-up of archives and collections to the public further enhances this potential – allowing people greater access to information and the ability to attribute their own meaning to it. Meaning becomes much more important that the information itself.

How do we make sense of it all though? How do we make our way through the masses of information and content? We do need increased media literacy – by the creators (the millions of them) and in the sifting and filtering ability of the audiences (millions more!). Given this caveat, it is our belief that the opportunities and benefits of open access far outstrip the challenges.

Remapping Europe is seeking a new generation of digital storytellers. Remix is both the conceptual starting point and the tool to remap Europe. The existing narrative of a single new image, photograph, recording, sound or story is ‘de-constructed’ from the individual perspective of the participant and a new imagery based on the original is then created. In his book, Remix: Making Art and Commerce Thrive in the Hybrid Economy, Lawrence Lessig (2008) ‘presents this as a desirable ideal and argues … that the health, progress, and wealth creation of a culture is fundamentally tied to this participatory remix process’.

As remix culture is becoming more acknowledged as an essential aspect of contemporary art and cultural practice, Remapping Europe – a Remix provides many opportunities to exchange, interact, to be involved and to ensure peer-to-peer learning. It goes far beyond the individual remix, the individual organisation, institution or community.

More about Remix Culture

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Remix_culture
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DIY_culture
http://blogs.zemos98.org/abrelatas/2012/07/04/remix-culture-course/
http://www.europeansouvenirs.eu/why/
http://www.nfb.ca/film/rip_a_remix_manifesto/ (video)
http://blip.tv/good-copy-bad-copy/good-copy-bad-copy-full-feature-364089 (video)

This article contains texts from “Remapping Europe – a Remix: a case study in international and inter-institutional collaboration and networking” by Katherine Watson and Vivian Paulissen, to be published in “Migrating Heritage: Networks and Collaborations across European Museums, Libraries and Public Cultural Institutions” by Ashgate Publishing Ltd, Wey Court East, Union Road, Farnham, Surrey GU9 7PT, England.

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Remapping Europe: case study in international and inter-institutional collaboration.

Collaboration across Europe benefits from some key ingredients, which need to be at the root of our working processes. We must cross and indeed break-down borders on many physical and metaphysical levels. Collaboration enhances the ‘spaces in-between’, the intersections between, people, organisations and ideas. In our complicated (but very rich) 21st century, the intersections are not of two spheres converging, but of many – layered, interconnected – and made even more complex by the digital opportunities that envelop us.

The artists of European Souvenirs (left to right): Karol Rakowski (Poland), Bariş Gürsel (Turkey), Farah Rahman (Netherlands), Malaventura (Spain), Noriko Okaku (Japan / UK). Pic by Ricardo Barquín Molero.

The artists of European Souvenirs (left to right): Karol Rakowski (Poland), Bariş Gürsel (Turkey), Farah Rahman (Netherlands), Malaventura (Spain), Noriko Okaku (Japan / UK).

This paper considers a thought provoking project through several lenses, through several intersections. The two year experimental project Remapping Europe – a Remix was initiated by Doc Next Network, a network instigated by the Youth and Media Programme of the European Cultural Foundation. The project launched in De Balie, Amsterdam in October 2012 with a live cinema performance by five young multimedia artists from different corners of Europe called European Souvenirs. (more…)

Remapping Europe, a Remix Project
Remapping Europe, a Remix Project investigates imagery about migrants in Europe, and the relation between migrant portrayal in mainstream media and public opinion.
Remapping Europe, a Remix Project is an investigative artistic project by Doc Next Network with activities that stem from one underlying principle: re-mixing of media as a method to re-view, re-investigate and re-consider prevailing imagery of migrants in European societies.

hero_bike2In the public debate and imagery of Europe, migrants are still often portrayed along merely national, ethnic or religious lines. Specific local and personal perspectives of immigrants are often lacking and important country-or region-specific migration contexts not nuanced. This exclusion of the perspective of migrants in mainstream media also hinders creative and cultural potential. It does no justice to an inclusive and creative Europe.

Doc Next Network explores these notions in a two year project called Remapping Europe, a Remix Project. The aim of the multilayered project is to highlight the own perspectives of young migrant media-makers in four countries by including their mediaworks, stories and visions in the public discourse.

We are working with some 50  young media makers from Poland, Turkey, Spain and the UK , who have a migrant background,  to   deconstruct existing imagery of migrants in different European countries and… to remix that. By presenting their  visual remix stories we aim to create a new imagery of migrants: in and of Europe. We are interested in the debate around media, migrants, Europe and ‘ self-representation’. We invite you to take part in our journey!

Methodology
We use re-mixing of media both as a tool as well as a cultural framework. The concept of ‘remix’book_catalog refers to a broad set of social and cultural practices consisting of the fragmentation, re-ordering, and re-contextualisation of both pre-existing and new content – whether text, sound or image. A method which reveals the local and personal perspectives of migrants, as captured by a new generation of digital storytellers. Ultimately, we want to ‘re-map’ Europe visually, geographically and mentally.

Activities

Co-organisers

  • Towarzystwa Inicjatyw Twórczych “ę” (Creative Initiatives “ę”), Poland
  • Future Film Programme of the British Film Institute, UK
  • MODE Istanbul, Turkey
  • ZEMOS98, Spain

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BFI’s Doc Next Media Lab open for entries.

3b2efb2f-76a2-4df7-b347-6c310f6380bdt2_940_226_ScaleAged 21 to 25? Have experience making films? Read on…

BFI is looking for 10 filmmakers to become a part of our Doc Next Media Lab. As part of the Lab you’ll receive a £750 bursary, technical film training from professionals, tutoring on different documentary styles, methods and ideas, and the chance to develop and hone your art into something special. (more…)